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Dipika Kohli – form/space atelier

Since you’ll probably already be in the neighborhood ( 2407 1st ), I’d urge you to swing by form/space atelier and check out Dipika Kohli’s drawings. You can view them through June 5th.

Design-Kompany

I draw lines with Sharpie markers. I like to keep things simple and uncluttered. It’s a life philosophy, you could say. I don’t own a car or a cellphone (egad!), and I draw with really basic materials. Marker. Paper.

To tell the truth, I think people overconsume. Keeping my drawings simple is one way I can say: “Hey, you don’t need to have a lot to be a lot.”

My favorite material is paper. I used to think it was canvas, but that’s changed. I like making zines, collaging paper onto paper. I put words in sometimes, cut-up stories from travel journals I wrote in my 20s. You don’t have to feel so precious about Sharpie art, either. It’s just markers.


1 Comment on "Dipika Kohli – form/space atelier"

  1. Paul Pauper | June 5, 2009 at 10:52 am |

    Please do stop in today, last day, everything must go!

    Next week, new show…

    Shannon Barry exhibits at Form/Space Atelier June 12- July 5. Opening reception June 12, 6pm.

    Form/Space Atelier Program for June 2009

    Show Title: The Quiet Society

    Show Duration: June 12- July 5, 2009

    Opening Reception June 12, 6PM, as part
    of Belltown Second Friday Artwalk http://www.belltownartwalk.com

    Shannon Barry studied in the atelier of Mark Kang-O’Higgins at the Gage Academy of Art, Seattle. The Quiet Society is her second consecutive solo exhibition at Form/Space Atelier, and her third exhibit overall at the gallery.

    Artist’s Statement:

    This series is called The Quiet Society because the central characters, despite their different surroundings, all share a common relaxed state.-Shannon Barry

    Curator’s Notes:

    Shannon Barry eschews obfuscation at every chance she can, and her art is no exception. Ms. Barry has a great degree of skill as an artist, and has distinguished herself as an academic through her study at the atelier of Mark Kang O’Higgins, and since passing from Gage, formidable and sustained self-study of art literature, New York museum visits and consistent studio practice. Anyone familiar with the curriculum at the Gage Academy of Art is aware of the rigorous battery of daily life study, unquestionably the time-honored truth of an artist’s training. Draftsmanship cannot be faked, where it is required for freehand expression. Ms. Barry is an outstanding draftsperson, along the lines of Lucien Freud, Alice Neel and Wayne Thiebaud. Ms. Barry paid homage to Thiebaud’s hand in a years-long series of donuts and coffee cups in oil on canvas, her primary medium. She was living across the street from Top Pot Donuts at the time, and this series was a visual report, almost anthropological, of her environment at the time. This series was also Ms. Barry’s first commercial success, her first collector purchasing a work from her which has fixed her current rate of value. A curated showing of this series was exhibited as part of a group show at Form/Space Atelier in April 2008.
    Ms. Barry next began a series of large-scale abstract landscapes of clouds in bright, cartoon-like renderings. As a curator, I find this series to be a bold expression, and as art objects, these paintings are extremely original, eye-catching and elicit happy emotions in virtually every observer. The case for a therapeutic work of art could definitely be made with Ms. Barry’s Clouds series. The “wow” factor was recorded by this curator, who sat with these paintings in an exhibit at Form/Space Atelier in August of 2008, “wow” being the consistent ejaculation of those visiting the exhibit during the duration of the show.
    With the advent of the Quiet Society in June 2009, Ms. Barry returns to production of large-scale figures in oil on canvas. The characters in these paintings, with the exception of a work after John Singer Sargent, are the product of Ms. Barry’s imagination. She is sure of her expression with this series. Her drafting, color-mixing and compositional skills are synergized in masterstrokes.

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